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bean fava broad windsor Enlarge View
bean fava broad windsor
  • Broad Windsor Fava Bean
  • Broad Windsor Fava Bean
  • bean fava broad windsor
 
  • Broad Windsor Fava Bean
  • Broad Windsor Fava Bean
  • bean fava broad windsor

Product Quantity Price
Broad Windsor Fava Bean (25 seeds) (FB101) $2.50
Packaging Type: NA
 

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Broad Windsor Fava Bean

         
 
3 Reviews | Write a Review
 
 

75 days. Yields gourmet high-protein beans on upright nonbranching plants. An old English favorite.

 
Broad Windsor Fava Bean
Overall Rating:
         
5.0
 
 
Number of Reviews: 3
Easy to Grow 4.5
EarlyMaturity 3.0

100.0% would recommend this item to a friend.

 
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1 out of 1 people found the following review helpful:

Nickname:
cdavis4
Location:
Redlands, CA
Date:
May 21, 2014
          5.0
 
Easy to Grow
Easy to Grow 5.0
EarlyMaturity 3.0
 

What are the pros? Easy to grow.

What are the cons? work involved in shelling

Review:

Grew them in winter in place of where my tomato plants. Used the tomato cages for support. Planted two seeds per cage. All of them came up. Beautiful plants with attractive flowers. I was nervous about the pods forming because of being in a warm weather climate. No issues, produced well. Only dislike is the need to shell and then flash boil to remove skin. Great taste when added to salads or any grain dish.

Would you recommend this product to a friend? Yes

Was this review helpful? Yes No Report inappropriate review

By cdavis4 21 May 2014

3 out of 3 people found the following review helpful:

Nickname:
Radish
Location:
Paso Robles, CA
Date:
February 16, 2014
          5.0
 
Fantastic Favas
Easy to Grow 5.0
EarlyMaturity 3.5
 

What are the pros? Easy to grow, long producer

What are the cons? Heat kills it

Review:

I started growing Fava's last winter. They do well in Central California until the summer, so plant them early. I usually plant the Windsor Fava bean between October and November and then again in January, depending on the December temperatures. This year was a particularly cold December for California and I lost about half of my Fava's. The survivors are already a foot high. I have since filled in the holes with more seeds. They should start producing by April and should last until July. If we have a cool May they may last longer. In any case my green beans will be producing by then so it will be a trade.

Would you recommend this product to a friend? Yes

Was this review helpful? Yes No Report inappropriate review

By Radish 16 Feb 2014

15 out of 15 people found the following review helpful:

Nickname:
San Diego Gardener
Date:
September 19, 2011
          5.0
 
Old Favorite
Easy to Grow 4.0
EarlyMaturity 3.0
 

What are the pros?

What are the cons?

Review:

We have planted Broad Windsor Fava Beans in our winter garden for the past 3 or 4 years and have always been pleased with the results. They grow quickly to 5' or so and need staking or a cage of some sort (we just use our tomato cages from the summer). They have always produced extremely well and seem to be pretty forgiving about when you start them. We have started seeds in coastal San Diego anywhere between September and February and had good returns. We had one year with lower yields but we believe this was likely due to an infestation of nematodes in the soil that heavily damaged their roots. We almost always have 100% germination. And last year the seeds survived and produced well after being dug up and thrown around by a skunk just as they had begun to germinate. We like to pick the beans when the pods have filled out but before they have reached full size. Harvesting before the beans are fully mature allows you to avoid the tedious job of having to slip the cooked beans from their skins. The skins at this point are tender enough to eat and compliment the sweetness of the inner bean with a a slight touch of bitterness. Every year we let a few reach full maturity because the texture is drier and the flavor is more intense. Dried favas are also wonderful, and very different from fresh. If you grow enough, it is worth drying some for use in soups and stews throughout the year.

Would you recommend this product to a friend? Yes

Was this review helpful? Yes No Report inappropriate review

By San Diego Gardener 19 Sep 2011

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