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cardoon gobbo di nizzia
  • Gobbo Di Nizzia Cardoon
  • cardoon gobbo di nizzia
 
  • Gobbo Di Nizzia Cardoon
  • cardoon gobbo di nizzia

Product Quantity Price
Gobbo Di Nizzia Cardoon (25 seeds) (AR103) $2.50
Packaging Type: NA

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Gobbo Di Nizzia Cardoon

         
 
4 Reviews | Write a Review
 
 
A rare cardoon from Italy, its broad white stalks are eaten fried, sauteed, pickled and in soups. Italians eat it raw, dipped in olive oil. The root is also edible, tasty, and can be used like parsnips. The plant is similar in culture and appearance to artichokes. Cardoons have been popular in Europe since ancient Rome. Beautiful ornamental plants.

 
Gobbo Di Nizzia Cardoon
Overall Rating:
         
4.5
 
 
Number of Reviews: 4
Easy to Grow 3.5
EarlyMaturity 2.5

100.0% would recommend this item to a friend.

 
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2 out of 3 people found the following review helpful:

Nickname:
Marlene
Location:
Roanoke, VA
Date:
March 26, 2014
          5.0
 
Grew up on Cardoon
Easy to Grow 2.0
EarlyMaturity 0.0
 

What are the pros? Cooks up easy

What are the cons? nothing

Review:

Being Italian, I grew up on Cardoon. Of course I can't get it now here in VA, and have been looking for it for a long time. When I was a kid, my mom would cut in small 3-4 inch pieces and string it, par boil it until tender, and then dip in egg and bread crumbs and fry it in Olive Oil. It is so delicious. I'd love to be able to grow some again.

Would you recommend this product to a friend? Yes

Was this review helpful? Yes  No

4 out of 9 people found the following review helpful:

Nickname:
Michael
Location:
Watsonville, CA
Date:
January 22, 2014
          4.0
 
Like little artichokes
Easy to Grow 5.0
EarlyMaturity 4.0
 

What are the pros? Tasty chokes

What are the cons? Bitter stalks

Review:

I haven't grown this particular cardoon but I did grow a generic batch of cardoon seeds. The plants are like artichokes but taller. I tried blanching the stalks but found them, though edible, overly bitter. I hope these named kinds are better and per reviews they seem to be. BUT they have lots and lots of flowers, which are like small artichokes. The leaves aren't useful but the choke parts are great for cooking. Steam them, remove the choke, and throw away the rest. Then use the chokes in a good pasta sauce recipe or any other use. Delicious. By the way they did NOT seed themselves all over and I live in the area in the U.S. where 99% of the artichokes come from so you can't find a friendlier climate at least in the U.S.

Would you recommend this product to a friend? Yes

Was this review helpful? Yes  No

6 out of 6 people found the following review helpful:

Nickname:
CitySlicker
Location:
San Diego, CA
Date:
December 24, 2013
          5.0
 
Huge and Gorgeous
Easy to Grow 5.0
EarlyMaturity 2.0
 

What are the pros? Unusual

What are the cons? no dislikes

Review:

I planted cardoon because a) I had never seen a mature plant, b) I had/have some places in the garden that needed plants, and c) I wanted to add it to my edible landscape but had no plans to eat it. Cardoon is very similar to artichoke when growing from seed. The seeds were sown in 14" x 14", 6" deep trays. Germination was 100%. I planted them out in the garden in early Spring 2013. With mostly neglect all of the plants have performed amazingly! The plants are 5' across and 4' tall! Leaves are a gorgeous silver-green and the massive leaves hang gracefully to the ground. The blossoms are purple and look like miniature artichokes--so cute and a great cut flower. After watching them perform so well in less tended areas of the garden, I moved some to the front garden and they transplanted so well that I moved more to edge my potato patch.

Would you recommend this product to a friend? Yes

Was this review helpful? Yes  No

20 out of 20 people found the following review helpful:

Nickname:
Finch
Date:
September 7, 2012
          4.0
 
Worth fiddling with
Easy to Grow 2.5
EarlyMaturity 3.0
 

What are the pros?

What are the cons?

Review:

I grew cardoons as an experiment. They are a good deal of work, as you'll need to wrap the whole plant (except for the top leaves) for a couple of weeks to blanch the ribs, then strip the leaves and use a vegetable peeler to get rid of the thorny edge and the tough, thready strings along the backs of the ribs. Then you'll want to blanch the stalks to remove the bitterness before you put them to their final use. On the plus side, they have a delicate, appealing taste - somewhere between artichoke and celery, but milder than either - and a pleasant, juicy texture. As an added bonus, it looks like I'll get at least two crops from mine. I cut them to the ground in early August (I'm in a warm-weather zone) and they sprouted fresh leaves that are well on their way to a new rounds of cardoons.

Would you recommend this product to a friend? Yes

Was this review helpful? Yes  No
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