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Tabasco Pepper
  • Tabasco Pepper
  • Tabasco Pepper
 
  • Tabasco Pepper
  • Tabasco Pepper

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Tabasco Pepper (25 seeds) (HPP106) $2.50

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Tabasco Pepper

         
 
15 Reviews | Write a Review
 
 
90 days. (C. frutescens) This famous heirloom was introduced into Louisiana in 1848 and became the main ingredient in Tabasco Pepper Sauce. This pepper is very hot and has a delicious flavor. The plants grow up to 4 feet tall and are covered with small, thin peppers. Needs a warm summer or can be grown as a potted plant. Fruit ripen from green to orange, then red.
 
Tabasco Pepper
Overall Rating:
         
5.0
 
 
Number of Reviews: 15
Easy to Grow 4.5
EarlyMaturity 3.5

100.0% would recommend this item to a friend.

 
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0 out of 0 people found the following review helpful:

Nickname:
Corey
Location:
Akron, OH, United States
Date:
January 16, 2017
          5.0
 
Wow
Easy to Grow 5.0
EarlyMaturity 3.0
 

What are the pros? Plentiful

What are the cons? Don't keep well

Review:

Healthy plants just took all summer to come to fruit.

Would you recommend this product to a friend? Yes

Was this review helpful? Yes  No

1 out of 1 people found the following review helpful:

Nickname:
Corey
Location:
Akron, OH, United States
Date:
December 7, 2016
          5.0
 
Did great
Easy to Grow 5.0
EarlyMaturity 3.5
 

What are the pros? Healthy

What are the cons? Slow

Review:

Easy to grow and get started. Slow to mature but came on strong all at the same time, which was ok because I was making sauce. Very hot, thin walled and didn't keep well in the fridge. Plants were large and healthy. No complaints

Would you recommend this product to a friend? Yes

Was this review helpful? Yes  No

1 out of 1 people found the following review helpful:

Nickname:
Shule
Location:
New Plymouth, ID, United States
Date:
November 17, 2016
          4.0
 
Fascinating
Easy to Grow 3.0
EarlyMaturity 2.0
 

What are the pros? taste; super hot; juicy; nice

What are the cons? late

Review:

This was my latest pepper of 2016 that I started early in a Strong Camel greenhouse (transplanted outdoors in the spring). Peppers were finally turning orange in November. Nevertheless, this pepper deserves respect. I ate a yellow one in November and wow. First, I started with the tip. The taste was great (I can see why people would make hotsauce with it), but the heat felt a lot like a rugburn. It lasted a long time. I ate the rest, and it felt similar to, but hotter, than a Habanero, and it lasted a really long time. Tabasco is said to be between 30k to 50k SHU (about like Cayenne), but this was more like a Carolina Reaper to my mouth (yes, I have eaten one), except Tabasco didn't make me sweat, and the burn that followed in my stomach was more consistent (and the stomach heat didn't last as long); the mouth heat lasted longer, though, I thought. It's easily one of the most painful peppers I've experienced. I hear the late season ones are a lot hotter (so, that might explain it).

Would you recommend this product to a friend? Yes

Was this review helpful? Yes  No

0 out of 1 people found the following review helpful:

Nickname:
Jake
Location:
Savage, MN, United States
Date:
September 7, 2016
          5.0
 
Lots decorative hot
Easy to Grow 5.0
EarlyMaturity 3.0
 

What are the pros? Many

What are the cons? Hot for the Scandinavian taste

Review:

Its very nice in a flower garden, but I can't eat any since Minnesota has fewer people who enjoy hot peppers. Difficult to give away.

Would you recommend this product to a friend? Yes

Was this review helpful? Yes  No

7 out of 7 people found the following review helpful:

Nickname:
Bayou Gardener
Location:
Houston, TX, United States
Date:
February 3, 2016
          5.0
 
Childhood Memories
Easy to Grow 5.0
EarlyMaturity 3.0
 

What are the pros? Just plant and forget it

What are the cons? NONE

Review:

When I was a child in Louisiana, everyone use to have them growing along side of their houses as perennials (along with banana trees). My grandmother would always make the grandkids pick these so that she could make pepper vinegar. The plants are so easy to grow, no maintenance at all. I have plants that are at least five years old and still fruiting. I remember grade school field trips to Avery Island to visit the McIIhinney factory- the vast fields of tabasco plants and the choking smell of the barrels of aging hot sauce in the large warehouse. Plant early to get a bumper crop of peppers.

Would you recommend this product to a friend? Yes

Was this review helpful? Yes  No
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