Search results for: 'Tomatoes - seed'

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True Black Brandywine Tomato
TP114
$3.00
Rating:
88%

80-90 days. Potato leaf. This fine variety was sent to us by our friend, famed seed collector and food writer, William Woys Weaver, of Pennsylvania. It was passed down to him from his Quaker grandfather’s collection dating back to the 1920s. As to its history, Will states “The ‘true’ Black Brandywine was bred sometime in the late 1920s by Dr. Harold E. Martin (1888-1959), a dentist turned plant breeder who is best remembered today for his famous pole lima with huge seeds. Dr. Martin lived in Westtown, Penn., only a few miles from my grandfather’s place in West Chester, and the two were gardening buddies. It was through that connection that his grandfather managed to wheedle seed out of the good doctor, as well as the details on how he created it. Dr. Martin always had a high opinion of his plant creations and did not like to share them. He charged 25 cents a seed for his lima, unheard of in those days. And he never released his Black Brandywine to a seed company, nor did he share it with many people, so I am fairly certain it never circulated among growers like his popular lima bean. According to my grandfather, Black Brandywine was a controlled cross between Brandywine and the original brown Beefsteak tomato otherwise known as Fejee Improved. Fejee Improved is probably extinct.” We thank Will for entrusting us with this great-tasting tomato that is extra large in size and full of the deep, earthy and sweet flavor that has made blackish-purple tomatoes so popular. Some fruit tended to crack, but the yield was heavy, and the plants were vigorous and did well in our hot Missouri summer. Superior for salsa and cooking. We enjoyed these all summer, both fresh and in countless recipes. A great home garden variety that will surely become a favorite.

  • Full Sun
  • Sprouts in 7-14 Days
  • Ideal Temperature: 75-95 Degrees F
  • Seed Depth: 1/8 inch
  • Plant Spacing: 24"
  • Frost Hardy: No
  • Solanum lycopersicum

Growing Tips: Start indoors 6-10 weeks before last frost. Heat mat helps to warm soil and speed germination.

 

Litchi Tomato or Morelle De Balbis
GR112
$3.50
Rating:
71%

75-90 days. The most intriguing garden berry we have ever seen, and with superb creamy and mild cherry flavor. A totally unique fruit, it is delightful to imagine litchi tomato into myriad culinary interpretations from mock cherry pies to chutneys and pickles. Its Latin name is Solanum sisymbriifolium, but it goes by many aliases, Vila Vila in Latin America, litchi tomato in the U.S and in France, Morelle de Balbis. It is a favorite fruit here at Baker Creek and has even been seen growing in the home garden of Canadian prime minister Justin Trudeau. While the alien like plants may seem like a new innovation, litchi tomato was celebrated in seed catalogs of antiquity as an exotic and delicious fruit. The 1896 Wilson’s Seed Farm catalog featured a plant referred to as (Solanum anthrophagorum) it was described as a bright red fruit that lends well to pies and sauces. The Wilson’s catalog also told of the fruit being used as a condiment for a cannibals meal of human flesh in Fiji. Botanists believe the litchi tomato to be native to South America, yet early accounts mention it as a plant growing in the islands of the South Pacific. Large plants grow to 5’ and are covered with thorns; sweet red fruit and large white flowers. Lovely to look at, but be careful with the thorns! The fruit is about the size of a cherry and taste like a cherry crossed with a tomato. A very pretty and attractive plant that originated in South America, but has been naturalized in many countries. You can grow litchi tomato just as you would grow regular tomatoes.

  • 8-12 hours of Sun
  • Sprouts in 14-21 Days
  • Ideal Temperature: 75-85 Degrees F
  • Seed Depth: 1/8"
  • Plant Spacing: 18"
  • Frost Hardy: No
  • Solanum sisymbriifolium

Growing Tips: Start transplants indoors 12-24 weeks before last frost, barely covering. Hold at warm temps, 70-85F; do not allow soil to dry out. Transplant after last frost.

Garden Huckleberry
GR103
$3.00
Rating:
83%

75 days. An antioxidant rich garden berry that undergoes the most miraculous flavor transformation when cooked and just lightly sweetened! There is a stark contrast between eating the berries raw and cooked and sweetened state. The raw ripe berries have a tart flavor, similar to tomatillo, yummy for savory snacking and salsas. The cooked and lightly sweetened berries are reminiscent of blackberry or gooseberry. The garden huckleberry is native to Africa and is a solanaceous berry in the tomato family. The intense purple black hue of the berries indicates high levels of the antioxidant anthocyanin. We adore this nutritious, quick maturing annual which produces masses of fruit in a short season. For very best flavor it is important to harvest at the correct stage. Berries will be a shiny, green to black when under-mature; at this stage the flavor will be unpleasant and the berries may be slightly poisonous. The berries mature to a dull black color and should be slightly soft to the touch; at this point the berries are perfect to eat and quite tasty. The truly spectacular flavor of these berries is revealed when the berries are cooked and sweetened; this brings out a fruity, blackberry-like flavor that is simply sublime. We have seen these berries re-imagined into delectable jams, pies, syrups and fillings--easily one of the most rewarding fruit crops to grow!

    • 6-12 hours of Sun
    • Sprouts in 7-21 Days
    • Ideal Temperature: 65-75 Degrees F
    • Seed Depth: 1/8"
    • Plant Spacing: 15-18"
    • Frost Hardy: No
    • Solanum melanocerasum

Growing Tips: Start indoors in fine, moist soil, 6-8 weeks before setting out after frost. Harvest berries only when fully ripe, very black and soft.

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