You have not viewed any products recently.

 
Greek Sweet Red Squash Enlarge View
Greek Sweet Red Squash
  • Greek Sweet Red Squash
  • Greek Sweet Red Squash
 
  • Greek Sweet Red Squash
  • Greek Sweet Red Squash

Product Quantity Price
Greek Sweet Red Squash (15 seeds) (SQ166) $2.75

Share This Product

fb Twitter Pinterest Email
 
 

Greek Sweet Red Squash

         
 
37 Reviews | Write a Review
 
 
(C. moschata) 105 days. Here is one delicious squash: the long-necked, reddish tan fruits are filled with sweet, deep orange flesh that’s richly flavored. Attractive, large vines are highly productive. It was very resistant to squash bugs, too! This variety is super rare, and I believe we are the only source.
 
Greek Sweet Red Squash
Overall Rating:
         
4.5
 
 
Number of Reviews: 37
Easy to Grow 4.5
EarlyMaturity 2.5

94.6% would recommend this item to a friend.

 
< Previous | 1 of 8 | Next >
 

2 out of 2 people found the following review helpful:

Nickname:
Adam
Location:
Annapolis Valley, Nova Scotia, Canada
Date:
January 8, 2018
          5.0
 
One of the best tasting squash
Easy to Grow 5.0
EarlyMaturity 2.0
 

What are the pros? Great Flavour, Productive

What are the cons? Late Maturity, Thin Flesh

Review:

This squash has amazing flavour! It's very sweet and kind of floral or fruity. I eat them without any butter or anything. I think anyone would love the taste. They were very productive vines though they were a bit late in this climate, but even the ones that didn't ripen on the vine tasted great. They had a very large seed cavity which means less flesh, but lots of seeds which is good if you're planning to save them. Mine didn't store for a very long time- harvested in Oct and last one was needed to by eaten by Jan. They were ripe with bright orange flesh even when the skin was still green. Will definitely be growing again!

Would you recommend this product to a friend? Yes

Was this review helpful? Yes  No

1 out of 1 people found the following review helpful:

Nickname:
ALR
Location:
Knoxville, TN, United States
Date:
January 8, 2018
          4.0
 
Latematuring but wonderful
Easy to Grow 4.0
EarlyMaturity 1.0
 

What are the pros? Delicious, fine grained

What are the cons? Late maturing

Review:

Just wanted to sing this squash's praises real quick. East TN had a wet year (2017) but this squash was still sweet, richly flavored, and fragrant. Not stringy, a lot of usable flesh, moist, beautiful dark papaya orange. Downy mildew didn't seem to bother it much---moderate effect. Didn't set fruit till late, which meant I had to harvest one squash early to protect it from a late October freeze---I cut that one open today (January) and it was as sweet and tasty as the one that cured in the field. Wow. Worth growing in zone 7b despite limited yield!

Would you recommend this product to a friend? Yes

Was this review helpful? Yes  No

3 out of 3 people found the following review helpful:

Nickname:
Garden Lover
Location:
Kent, OH, United States
Date:
November 5, 2017
          4.0
 
Outstanding
Easy to Grow 5.0
EarlyMaturity 3.0
 

What are the pros? pest resistant

What are the cons? none yet - wait until we taste

Review:

Summer 17 was our first experience with this squash and boy was it prolific. As advertised, squash bugs tended to avoid them in favor of all our other squash! The fruit were slower to mature than other squash but once they caught up, there was no slowing them down. We planted 5 plants rather snuggly and received 20 huge butternut like squash. At first I didn't think they would turn from dark green to an antique burnish orange in time for harvesting, but they did. We had them trellised but they sprawled 20 feet along the ground. I cut into one just now to bake - the flesh is moist and bright orange. Hoping the taste is equally memorable. If the taste is as good as we think, this may be our only winter squash next year!

Would you recommend this product to a friend? Yes

Was this review helpful? Yes  No

8 out of 8 people found the following review helpful:

Nickname:
Pat
Location:
Harleysville, PA, United States
Date:
October 11, 2017
          4.0
 
Very insect resistant
Easy to Grow 5.0
EarlyMaturity 3.0
 

What are the pros? Exceedingly pest resistant

What are the cons? large seed cavities.

Review:

I've had severe pest problems since moving from the west to east coast. Reading the reviews on this squashes bug resistance, I decided to give it a try. The vines are vigorous, spreading 30-40 feet in all directions. They do set fruit late, and I was worried they would fail to ripen. Once set, however, the vines just keep going, setting more fruit which quickly gain size. Vine borers did infest the plants, but the aggressive rooting at each leaf node kept the plants going. Squash bugs decimated my summer, and spaghetti squashes, but largely left this variety alone. By late August some fruit began to turn orange, and I tried one out. The seed cavity is large and the meat thin. The watery flesh was disappointing and not sweet. Since harvest and curing the rest, the squashes undergo an impressive transformation. Once the fruit is solidly orange and cured for several weeks, the flesh becomes much more reminiscent of butternuts. Some texture, but sweet and flavorful. very productive too.

Would you recommend this product to a friend? Yes

Was this review helpful? Yes  No

2 out of 3 people found the following review helpful:

Nickname:
Kirk
Location:
south eastern, IA, United States
Date:
September 28, 2017
          3.0
 
Hardy large.
Easy to Grow 4.5
EarlyMaturity 3.0
 

What are the pros? Hardy, large

What are the cons? amount of flesh per fruit

Review:

Grew this along with Burpee's Butterbush, and Waltham butternuts in hoophouse last year. This produces a vigorous, hardy vine that thrives on neglect. The fruits are large and beautiful. However, the necks were not nearly so large (nor totally filled with flesh) and the cavity was also large. Both the other butternuts equally as productive per area and had more usable flesh. Butterbush, though small, had the best flavor and deepest orange flesh so I crossed it with Greek Sweet Red and am growing out the cross this year. I am already getting several with the large size of GSR (but haven't eaten any yet, so the verdict is out on how well-filled they are). I would recommend if you have a hard time growing the more "domesticated" butternuts as it is vigorous and productive, but for eating quality or flesh yield it is similar or lesser than some other butternuts. YMMV. Cheers!

Would you recommend this product to a friend? Yes

Was this review helpful? Yes  No
< Previous | 1 of 8 | Next >
 
close (X)