HOW TO GROW AND SAVE SEEDS OF HYSSOP

Latin name Agastache hybrida is a perennial member of the mint family that blooms in the first year. In its first year the blooms will appear in mid summer, and bloom earlier the next spring.

 

HISTORY

Native to North America. A super pollinator attractor beloved by butterflies and bees and it makes a great long-lasting cut flower, too. The blooms are bright, long lasting and fragrant!

 

USES

  • Perennial beds.
  • Pollinator gardens.
  • Rehabilitation and restoration sites.
  • Beds, borders, tea garden, cottage garden.
  • Visited by a range of bees including honeybee (it is highly attractive to honeybees!), also attractive to butterflies like skippers, frittilaries. Hummingbirds are known to visit hyssop.

 

SEED STARTING

  • Surface sow seeds and just gently press into soil, as light aids germination.
  • Start indoors 8-10 weeks before last frost and transplant out after last chance of frost has passed, or direct seed outdoors after last frost has passed.
  • Ideal germination temperature is 65-70 F.

 

GROWING

  • Prefers full sun but will tolerate some shade.
  • Plants require well-drained soil in order to overwinter.
  • As perennials they will struggle to survive winter when planted in compacted, boggy soil.
  • Space plants 12-14 inches apart.
  • Plants are relatively drought tolerant and as long is soil is well drained, and they will not fuss about soil or fertility.

 

PESTS/SPECIAL CONSIDERATIONS

  • Typically a pest- and disease-free plant.
  • Plants will require well-drained soil in order to survive over the winter; they will not tolerate standing water in winter.

 

SEED STARTING

  • Saving seed from hyssop (agastache) is unreliable, but it is very easy to take cuttings.
  • Take fall or spring cuttings; in fall, snip cuttings and root, keeping indoors as a house plant and treating as a mother plant for propagation the next spring.
  • Spring cuttings are even easier; simply take green wood cuttings or woody cuttings to propagate.