HOW TO GROW AND SAVE THE SEEDS OF PETUNIA


Latin name Petunia x hybrida is a cold-sensitive tender perennial (hardy in zones 9-11) that is grown as an annual. An excellent container or bedding flower.


 

HISTORY

Petunias, as we know them today, are descended from two different varieties native to South America. These small-flowered varieties were brought to Europe in the 1800s, where cross-breeding and experimenting began. The two were crossed in a natural manner and have been stabilized, making these antique garden petunias a true heirloom, despite the 'x hybrida' in the Latin name.

USES

  • Ornamental
  • Beds, borders, butterfly garden, containers, cottage garden, hanging baskets, window boxes
  • Visited by butterflies, hawkmoths, and hummingbirds

 

 


 

  • Seeds germinate in 7-14 days.
  • Start seeds 10-12 weeks before last frost and transplant out after frost.
  • Surface sow seeds, as light aids germination.
  • germination temperature is 70-85 F.

 

  • Requires full sun and rich, well-drained soil.
  • Plants are very heat loving and quite drought tolerant, although consistent moisture (water once a week) is preferable.
  • Space plants 12 inches apart.
  • Deadhead spent flowers to encourage continued blooming.

PESTS/SPECIAL CONSIDERATIONS

  • Aphids can be a problem; keep this pest at bay with organic insecticidal soap.
  • Mites can also be kept under control with neem oil.
  • Overwatering or poorly drained soil can cause rot.

 

  • Petunias will readily self seed in mild winter climates.
  • To save seed, hand pick the brown seed pods.
  • Take care to collect the seed pods before they burst and spread seed across the garden.
  • Save seed over winter in a cool, dark, dry place.