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Rouge d'Alger Cardoon Enlarge View
Rouge d'Alger Cardoon
  • cardoon rouge d alger
  • Rouge d'Alger Cardoon
  • Rouge d'Alger Cardoon
  • Rouge d'Alger Cardoon
 
  • cardoon rouge d alger
  • Rouge d'Alger Cardoon
  • Rouge d'Alger Cardoon
  • Rouge d'Alger Cardoon

Product Quantity Price
Rouge d'Alger Cardoon (25 seeds) (AR106) $3.00

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Rouge d'Alger Cardoon

         
 
5 Reviews | Write a Review
 
 
This exciting heirloom Cardoon was developed in Algeria, hence the name. It has big, edible and ornamental stalks that are blushed in red, which is so striking against the blue-green leaves. The flowers are also beautiful and can be cooked before the buds open, like a small artichoke. One of the prettiest historic varieties you can plant.
 
Rouge d'Alger Cardoon
Overall Rating:
         
4.0
 
 
Number of Reviews: 5
Easy to Grow 3.0
EarlyMaturity 3.0

100.0% would recommend this item to a friend.

 
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2 out of 2 people found the following review helpful:

Nickname:
Leslie Trail
Location:
Meridian, ID, United States
Date:
August 3, 2018
          3.0
 
Love to eat Cardoons
Easy to Grow 3.0
EarlyMaturity 4.0
 

What are the pros? Pretty, tastes Great

What are the cons? sensitive to heat

Review:

I grew these last year and thy did not look good until for fall when they popped up and got a gray/blue to there color. This year all three came back after the winter and have look great even now with 100 degree weather.. Slow starters... don't like heat. Not really sure but I have harvested them once and they were great. The Gobbo Di Nizzia seem to do better in the heat, are a larger plant and I can harvest them about 3 time a year. This variety doing well this year and I will transplant to a shaded area in the fall and hopefully they well come back in the spring. I will plant some Di Nizzia in the shade too. PS I cannot rap to blanch the stocks get too much damage from bugs and in the heat they don't like being forced up as they want to spread out instead. That's ok I just soak them in water with vinegar to lower the bitterness. Love to eat cardoons!

Would you recommend this product to a friend? Yes

Was this review helpful? Yes  No

6 out of 6 people found the following review helpful:

Nickname:
spelt baker
Location:
SF Bay area, CA, United States
Date:
March 19, 2018
          5.0
 
Love the color
Easy to Grow 5.0
EarlyMaturity 5.0
 

What are the pros? Beautiful, not too spiny

What are the cons? None

Review:

If I can grow this, you can too.. I am very glad I got this red stalked variety because I couldn't tell it apart from my artichokes until maturity (lost the tags.. of course). I was going to harvest and eat the stalks, but I read somewhere that the flowers are very appealing to bees and hummers, so I'm going to let them go. They are beautiful, in any case. I tried to blanch the stalks (as you are supposed to with cardoon) but when I unbundled them, I found that the outer stalks were badly damaged from slugs, ants, earwigs, and etc., along with some rotting at the bottom. Probably won't do that again!

Would you recommend this product to a friend? Yes

Was this review helpful? Yes  No

33 out of 40 people found the following review helpful:

Nickname:
Rima
Location:
Lufkin, TX
Date:
February 9, 2015
          4.0
 
Interesting but not for food
Easy to Grow 0.0
EarlyMaturity 0.0
 

What are the pros? Interesting, hummers like it

What are the cons? All bloom at the same time

Review:

Fascinating plant and flower for the herb garden. Unusual. Makes a statement. Everyone asks what it is. I have them coming up all over the place as volunteers. I "edit out" the ones that are growing in a bad spot. I have let them come back year after year because the hummers just LOVE this flower. And they fight over the downy thistle for their nests. I planted a bunch of different artichokes for the food, and this is the only one coming back year after year (5? years running now.) Eating them is kind of not worth the effort because the heart is small, the plant is very spiny, and they all bloom at once so you have to be ready for a bunch all at the same time. I'm going to try the green globe again.....for eating anyway.

Would you recommend this product to a friend? Yes

Was this review helpful? Yes  No

50 out of 52 people found the following review helpful:

Nickname:
Lissa
Date:
October 2, 2012
          4.0
 
grows well in sub tropical Australia
Easy to Grow 3.0
EarlyMaturity 2.5
 

What are the pros?

What are the cons?

Review:

Artichoke, let alone Cardoon, is not something familiarly grown here in sub tropical Queensland but it sounded interesting so I thought I would give it a go. The information provided by Baker Creek is a little sketchy so I wasn't sure of what to expect with height and lifespan etc. I planted 5 seed and they all came up and have proven very hardy through our mild winter. Summer is now coming with it's heat and rain. The stalks have proven very useful for cooking, a good substitue for celery which takes so long to produce. My gardening friends are impressed and all wanting seed. BC tell me it is a perennial and warn me that it can become a weed if let go to seed. A little more information about it's growing habits would be useful in the description.

Would you recommend this product to a friend? Yes

Was this review helpful? Yes  No

26 out of 32 people found the following review helpful:

Nickname:
soupmaker
Date:
February 23, 2011
          4.0
 
An eyecatcher in the garden!
Easy to Grow 3.0
EarlyMaturity 2.5
 

What are the pros?

What are the cons?

Review:

Rouge d'Alger cardoon is a very beautiful cardoon with amazing color and form. The rouge at is mostly at the base of the stems and varies in shades from plant to plant. Grow on a few because not all will have the deeper color. A great all season accent for ornamental or edible gardens.

Would you recommend this product to a friend? Yes

Was this review helpful? Yes  No
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