Garlic and Onion Bulbs

Garlic is a beloved culinary staple and easy-to-grow garden vegetable native to Central Asia. This member of the allium, or onion, family adds pungency and flavor to innumerable dishes, and with a long shelf life, it is a perfect choice for those who love homegrown cooking. Growing garlic is exceptionally easy in most regions of the U.S., and it is well adapted to a wide range of northern and temperate regions across the globe. The plants require a cold period, and in fact they are very cold hardy. Garlic can be grown between USDA zones 3-8; however, individual garlic varieties may have more specific growing zone limitations. We offer a variety of hardneck, softneck and elephant garlic bulbs seasonally, usually in September, subject to availability.

PLEASE NOTE: We cannot ship garlic, live plants, tubers, or bulbs outside the U.S.

To learn more about growing garlic, and what time of year to buy and plant it, please see: How To Choose, Plant and Harvest Garlic

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Dubna Standard (1/2 lb)
GB120
$20.00
Rating:
0%
This hardneck, marbled purple stripe also comes to Baker Creek Seeds from Dr Jeff Nekola of the University of New Mexico, who shared over 300 varieties with us in 2013. According to Dr. Nekola, the variety was collected in Dubna, Russia by Edward Spaans of The Stinking Rose Farm in Grand Rapids MI. The large to jumbo-sized bulbs have 5 to 6 big outer cloves and a lovely purple blush on the outer wrappers. The variety makes great scapes also and being a late-maturing variety it will work well for extending your scape harvesting season. Sharp, hot garlic flavor and a good shelf-life. Plant individual garlic cloves in the fall, prior to the ground freezing, in well-prepared beds of soil that is rich in organic matter. Plant cloves 1 to 2 inches deep about 8 inches apart making sure that the tip of the clove is pointing up and the footprint of the root is down. In northern climates it may be necessary to cover with mulch prior to the hard freezes of winter and then uncover in spring. Provide adequate irrigation and weed control in order to achieve maximum bulb size. Harvest scapes when they have made one full curl and before becoming erect (can still be used erect however the texture is tougher). Garlic is ready for harvesting when the bulbs are completely filled out and plump. Watch for the bottom two leaves to brown and die back and for the rest of the plant to begin to yellow. Test dig a few bulbs to determine if crop is ready. Discontinue irrigation for about two weeks prior to harvest. Do not pull garlic up by the stalk but lift the garlic by digging with a fork or shovel. Harvested garlic should be spread out or hung away from direct sunlight for two to three weeks to cure (air conditioned location is okay). Make sure curing bulbs have adequate air circulation and are not piled atop of one another.
Elephant (1/2 lb)
GB142
$20.50
Rating:
100%

Limited quantity! ( Allium ampeloprasum) Actually a leek, not a true garlic, but of immense utility nonetheless. Super-large bulbs can easily exceed a half-pound, are comprised of a few very plump cloves. The flavor is all garlic! The gigantic cloves peel easily, giving you a lot of garlic in a hurry. Very useful for large recipes, pickles, etc. An old favorite! Plant individual garlic cloves in the fall, prior to the ground freezing, in well-prepared beds of soil that is rich in organic matter. Plant cloves 1 to 2 inches deep about 8 inches apart making sure that the tip of the clove is pointing up and the footprint of the root is down. In northern climates it may be necessary to cover with mulch prior to the hard freezes of winter and then uncover in spring. Provide adequate irrigation and weed control in order to achieve maximum bulb size. Harvest scapes when they have made one full curl and before becoming erect (can still be used erect however the texture is tougher). Garlic is ready for harvesting when the bulbs are completely filled out and plump. Watch for the bottom two leaves to brown and die back and for the rest of the plant to begin to yellow. Test dig a few bulbs to determine if crop is ready. Discontinue irrigation for about two weeks prior to harvest. Do not pull garlic up by the stalk but lift the garlic by digging with a fork or shovel. Harvested garlic should be spread out or hung away from direct sunlight for two to three weeks to cure (air conditioned location is okay). Make sure curing bulbs have adequate air circulation and are not piled atop of one another.

Kay's Backyard Garlic (1/2 LB)
GB105
$21.50
Rating:
91%

Garlic can be shipped to U.S. customers only except northern Idaho. (Softneck) Very Rare. This is a big, pearly-pink Artichoke variety that was found growing in an old Santa Fe garden in 1998. It originally had very small cloves the size of sunflower seeds and it is now our biggest softneck garlic. We have sent it to growers across the country and it seems to grow well in both coastal and cold regions – grower Paul Parma in Southern California said he'd never seen a garlic so huge. It has a rich, classic Italian flavor. Plant individual garlic cloves in the fall, prior to the ground freezing, in well-prepared beds of soil that is rich in organic matter. Plant cloves 1 to 2 inches deep about 8 inches apart making sure that the tip of the clove is pointing up and the footprint of the root is down. In northern climates it may be necessary to cover with mulch prior to the hard freezes of winter and then uncover in spring. Provide adequate irrigation and weed control in order to achieve maximum bulb size. Harvest scapes when they have made one full curl and before becoming erect (can still be used erect however the texture is tougher). Garlic is ready for harvesting when the bulbs are completely filled out and plump. Watch for the bottom two leaves to brown and die back and for the rest of the plant to begin to yellow. Test dig a few bulbs to determine if crop is ready. Discontinue irrigation for about two weeks prior to harvest. Do not pull garlic up by the stalk but lift the garlic by digging with a fork or shovel. Harvested garlic should be spread out or hung away from direct sunlight for two to three weeks to cure (air conditioned location is okay). Make sure curing bulbs have adequate air circulation and are not piled atop of one another.

Music Garlic (1/2 lb)
GB101
$21.50
Rating:
95%

(Hardneck) Beautiful white skinned with a hint of pink Porcelain garlic, very productive with an excellent keeping ability. Well adapted to colder regions. Originally from Italy, then brought to Canada in the 1980s. Cloves are very large making it a favorite among chefs. Plant individual garlic cloves in the fall, prior to the ground freezing, in well-prepared beds of soil that is rich in organic matter. Plant cloves 1 to 2 inches deep about 8 inches apart making sure that the tip of the clove is pointing up and the footprint of the root is down. In northern climates it may be necessary to cover with mulch prior to the hard freezes of winter and then uncover in spring. Provide adequate irrigation and weed control in order to achieve maximum bulb size. Harvest scapes when they have made one full curl and before becoming erect (can still be used erect however the texture is tougher). Garlic is ready for harvesting when the bulbs are completely filled out and plump. Watch for the bottom two leaves to brown and die back and for the rest of the plant to begin to yellow. Test dig a few bulbs to determine if crop is ready. Discontinue irrigation for about two weeks prior to harvest. Do not pull garlic up by the stalk but lift the garlic by digging with a fork or shovel. Harvested garlic should be spread out or hung away from direct sunlight for two to three weeks to cure (air conditioned location is okay). Make sure curing bulbs have adequate air circulation and are not piled atop of one another.

Russian Red Garlic (1/2 lb)
GB117
$21.00
Rating:
93%

"Russian Red Garlic- A rocambole hardneck garlic that has been thriving in the Pacific Northwest for generations. Originally introduced from Russia, the red- striped variety boasts impressive cold hardiness. A beloved favorite for its pungent flavor and great storage quality. Expect 8-15 cloves per bulb. Plant individual garlic cloves in the fall, prior to the ground freezing, in well-prepared beds of soil that is rich in organic matter. Plant cloves 1 to 2 inches deep about 8 inches apart making sure that the tip of the clove is pointing up and the footprint of the root is down. In northern climates it may be necessary to cover with mulch prior to the hard freezes of winter and then uncover in spring. Provide adequate irrigation and weed control in order to achieve maximum bulb size. Harvest scapes when they have made one full curl and before becoming erect (can still be used erect however the texture is tougher). Garlic is ready for harvesting when the bulbs are completely filled out and plump. Watch for the bottom two leaves to brown and die back and for the rest of the plant to begin to yellow. Test dig a few bulbs to determine if crop is ready. Discontinue irrigation for about two weeks prior to harvest. Do not pull garlic up by the stalk but lift the garlic by digging with a fork or shovel. Harvested garlic should be spread out or hung away from direct sunlight for two to three weeks to cure (air conditioned location is okay). Make sure curing bulbs have adequate air circulation and are not piled atop of one another."

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