Celery & Celeriac

(Apium graveolens) Celery has been grown since antiquity. It is famously tricky to master, but following suggestions for moisture, soil, temperature and fertility will help you to have a delicious crop. Due to a long growing season, it's best to start celery seed indoors, 10 to 12 weeks before the last frost date. Seeds are slow to germinate but can be encouraged by soaking overnight in water before sowing. Surface sow, and do not allow the seeds to dry out. Use of a heat mat is recommended, as the tiny seeds prefer temps around 75°F (24°C). Once established, seedlings can be transplanted to a well-worked garden bed. Plant your celery where it will get six hours of sun, but preferably somewhere that the plants will be shaded during the hottest part of the day. Plants perform best in rich, moist soil, so be sure to prepare the celery bed before planting by adding generous amounts of rich, well-rotted compost and don't skimp on the fertility. Space plants 6-8 inches apart. Water regularly for best flavor; celery despises inconsistent irrigation. Take note that Chinese celery is a much easier-to-grow crop. The plants do not require as much fertility or exacting climatic conditions as European type celery, if you are new to gardening and don't feel up to the challenge, or you do not have rich soil and access to compost, Chinese celery is a great and more drought-tolerant alternative. Chinese celery can be sown in much the same way with less attention to fertility and a less rigorous approach to watering. Celeriac is grown just like European celery.

COOK IT! Celery Recipes HERE

GROW IT! Celery Growing Tips HERE

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