Corn

(Zea mays) The quintessential Native American crop, corn was a staple of indigenous peoples from South America to the Great Lakes. It’s believed to have been domesticated in Mexico, and it may be of the world’s oldest agricultural crops. It’s best seeded directly into the garden, 1-2 inches deep, in good, rich, well-drained soil, right about the time of the last spring frost. Plant it in blocks rather than long narrow rows to improve pollination. Whether planted in rows or beds, allow an average of one square foot per plant. Corn can be very drought tolerant, but ears fill best when there is good soil moisture as the tassels and silk are first emerging, and when dry conditions are not allowed to prevail at tasseling time. Harvest sweet corn when the kernels are full of milky-colored juice; allow other types to remain on the stalks until fully dry. All types of heirloom corn are grown the same way. Sweet corn is picked when milky juice is contained within the kernels; clear juice indicates immaturity, and chewiness means the ear is over-mature. Ears of flour corn should be left on the plant until thoroughly dry in the fall.

COOK IT! Corn Recipes HERE

GROW IT! Corn Growing Tips HERE

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