Corn

Corn

(Zea mays) The quintessential Native American crop, corn was a staple of indigenous peoples from South America to the Great Lakes. It’s believed to have been domesticated in Mexico, and may be of the world’s oldest agricultural crops. It’s best seeded directly into the garden, in good, rich, well-drained soil, right about the time of the last spring frost. Plant it in blocks rather than long narrow rows, to improve pollination. Corn can be very drought tolerant, but ears fill best when there is good soil moisture when tassels and silk first emerge. Harvest sweet corn when the kernels are full of milky-colored juice; allow other types to remain on the stalks until fully dry. All types of heirloom corn are grown the same way. At about the time of last frost in spring, plant heirloom corn seeds directly into the richest soil available, 1-2 inches deep. Whether planted in rows or beds, allow the corn plants up to about one square foot per plant, on average. Ears fill best when dry conditions are not allowed to prevail at tasseling time. Sweet corn is picked when milky juice is contained within the kernels; clear juice is immature, and chewiness means the ear is over-mature. Flour corn is left on the plant until thoroughly dry in the fall.

COOK IT! Corn Recipes HERE

GROW IT! Corn Growing Tips HERE

Page 1 of 1
Japanese Black Sticky Corn
CN190
$4.00
Rating:
0%
Out of stock
Striped Japonica Corn
CN178
$4.00
Rating:
69%
85 days. The World’s Most Beautiful Corn Plant! Invite this vibrant ornamental flint corn into your edible landscape design and you won’t regret it. Plants reach 6 feet in height; foliage develops a brilliant, multi-colored striping in green, white, pink and yellow. Some stalks will be mostly all green; others will be striped with all four colors. It has wine-colored tassels and crimson-black kernels, adding a tropical touch to borders or container plantings. The sturdy stalks make a fantastic trellis for climbing ornamentals like sweet pea. When dried, the kernels grind into a tasty meal. This variety was bred in Japan and was introduced to America in the 1870s. During this period, called the Meiji period, corn was just becoming a popular staple in the Japanese diet, despite the fact that the crop had been introduced to the country centuries prior. Native American flint corn was first brought to Japan by the Portuguese in the 1500s; at the time, flint corn was considered primarily a fodder crop for livestock. During the Edo period in Japan (1603-1867), officials of the centralized government (who were mostly vegetarian due to religious reasons) discouraged the consumption of meat and the need for corn to feed livestock plummeted, relegating the newly introduced corn crop to relative obscurity. With the Meiji period (1868-1912), meat was reintroduced to the Japanese diet, and the need for corn as fodder rose. Along the way, it was discovered that corn could be a tasty crop for humans as well. Striped Japonica was developed during this resurgence of interest in corn in Japan. We have worked for years to find a pure strain, as most of what is offered on the market was badly contaminated with GMO corn, but after much effort, we present to you a strain that tested Non-GMO! Please enjoy this stunning treasure from historic Japan!
Page 1 of 1