Peas

(Pisum sativum) Peas are an annual cool-season legume. The origins of the domesticated pea are unknown, but wild peas are native to the Mediterranean basin and parts of western Asia. Peas have historically been an important, protein-rich storage crop. Peas thrive in cool weather and are often the first crop of the season. Plant peas directly into the garden in early spring or in late summer for a fall harvest. For fall planting, seed directly in the ground 60 days before first fall frost. (If your area stays above 75 degrees F into fall, you may not have a successful crop, and it is probably best to just plant in spring.) A trellis is essential to keep vining-type plants from trailing along the ground. Bush (dwarf) types do not grow so tall, and, planted in blocks, hold each other up without need of additional support. Ideal germination temperature is 40-70F. Seeds germinate in 7-14 days. Sow seeds 1⁄2 inch deep and 2 inches apart. Keep well weeded and be sure to mulch with straw or hay, as deeply cultivating around the base of the plant can disturb and destroy the plant. Many gardeners choose to innoculate their pea seeds with Rhizobium bacteria in order to boost yields and improve the soil. While not necessary, inoculation is advantageous.

COOK IT! Peas Recipes HERE

GROW IT! Peas Growing Tips HERE

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King Tut Purple Pea
GP114
$4.50
Rating:
81%
A very rare and amazing garden pea! One of the most historical peas known, this particular variety is said to have been taken out of the tomb of famed Egyptian pharaoh Tutankhamun, or King Tut. The story is that his servants planted and harvested these peas to help provide for his afterlife. Though some claim to have debunked the story, Lynn McKee’s family tradition asserts that her father received the seeds found in the boy King’s tomb, where they had been undisturbed for nearly 5,000 years until Howard Carter found the tomb on Nov. 4, 1922. From there, as the legend goes, the seeds were taken to England where they were propagated and shared with friends. “The conditions within Egyptian pyramids are very dry and would permit seed longevity in certain species to extend to thousands of years,” one document said. Some claim, though, it is likely the seeds originated in early 20th century English gardens. The Fortean Times says “It is sometimes said that Tutankhamun’s Pea originated on the country estate of Lord Caernarvon, who financed Howard Carter’s search for King Tut’s resting place and was subsequently named in honor of Caernarvon’s claim to fame, rather than the plant’s origin.” As an interesting turn to the story, we located the seed and found the story from Japanese seed collectors during our travels there. Stunning fuschia purple flowers give way to tasty, fat purple pods on strong and vigorous plants that love cool weather. This variety has proven highly productive and makes a delicious soup pea, or picked young as a purple snow pea. Try this piece of living history in your garden!
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