Squash, Winter

Squash, Winter

Winter squash and pumpkins are one of the most beautiful and delicious crops we grow! Many types will store in cool, dry conditions for up to 1 year. Grow these for a wonderful year-round healthy food supply.

How To Grow Winter Squash

Winter Squash Recipes

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Blue Hubbard Squash
SQ180
$3.00
Rating:
98%

110 days. A spectacular storage squash, the famously long-lasting Hubbard squash arrived in Marblehead, Massachusetts, in 1854 in the holds of a ship from the West Indies. Seeds from the large green squash that originated in South America were shared with local seedsman J.H Gregory. A savvy breeder, Gregory selected the Hubbard’s skin to a more unique blue color and devoted his career to marketing the massive fruit. Gregory credited a Miss Hubbard as the person who originally gifted him the seed; he noted that she told him it was the best tasting squash she had ever tried and that she was given the seeds from a captain aboard a ship from the West Indies. A conflicting account from a local Marblehead woman stated that Miss Hubbard had bred the squash in her home garden from seeds originally brought on the ship from the West Indies. Either way, the colossal blue squash was naturally a great choice for a long sea journey as the thick skin makes for a longer shelf life. Blue Hubbard squash is known for keeping up to 6 months in the pantry. The fruit can weigh from 15-40 pounds each, making it a top choice for restaurants and family meals.

  • Full Sun
  • Sprouts in 5-10 Days
  • Ideal Temperature: 70-95 Degrees F
  • Seed Depth: 1/2-1 inch
  • Plant Spacing: 18-36"
  • Frost Hardy: No
  • Cucurbita maxima

Growing Tips: Direct seed, or set out transplants after last frost date. Don’t let transplants become rootbound; don't disturb roots while transplanting. Needs rich soil. Harvest when rinds become very hard.

Kinshi Squash
SQ141
$3.00
Rating:
93%

(C. pepo) 85 days. We are excited to offer the true Japanese strain of this incredible squash introduced by Sakata Seed Company of Yokohama, Japan. It produces wheat-free, low-carb noodles in abundance on productive vines. According to some sources, Sakata Seed Co. developed an improved strain of a Chinese spaghetti-type squash. It is said that Burpee picked up this seed and began selling it as Vegetable Spaghetti in 1936. In Japan, spaghetti squash is most commonly called ‘Somen Kabocha’ or ‘Kinshi Uri.’ Somen means skinny noodles and Kinshi means golden thread, and it is very popular to eat the ‘noodles’ cold during the hot summer. The book Sosai Engei Zuhen (1951 by Jyouji Togashi & Suteki Shinohara) states that the spaghetti squash originated in China, some say in the 19th century. Sakata Seed Co. was founded in Yokohama in 1913, and there are records showing they were importing spaghetti squash to North America prior to 1921. Much of the paperwork before the war was lost in the Great Yokohama Air Raid, and there are no documents remaining to definitively answer where their squash originated. What we do know is that the Japanese have been growing this squash for over a hundred years, and people on both sides of the world have been enjoying it for at least that long!

  • Full Sun
  • Sprouts in 5-10 Days
  • Seed Depth: ½-1”
  • Ideal Temperature: 70-95 F
  • Plant Spacing: 18-36"
  • Frost Hardy: No
  • Cucurbita pepo.

Growing Tips: Direct seed or set out transplants after last frost date. Don’t let transplants become rootbound; don't disturb roots while transplanting. Needs rich soil. Harvest when rinds become very hard.

Marina Di Chioggia Pumpkin
SQ133
$3.50
Rating:
97%

95 days. The heirloom sea pumpkin of Chioggia, a fishing village on the coast of Italy, south of Venice. The large turban-shaped fruit is deep blue-green. It is one of the most beautiful and unique of all squash. A perfect variety for market gardeners. The rich, sweet flesh is a deep yellow-orange and of good quality, delicious baked or in pies. The fruit weighs about 10 lbs each and is produced on vigorous vines. Originally from South America, this warty winter squash made its way back to Spain and found its popularity in Italy. This dark orange and sweet fleshed fruit was introduced to Venice in the late 1600s and quickly became a beloved addition to the culinary culture. The network of lagoons south of Venice has been inhabited since the 5th century. Originally the people there fished and hunted small game, harvested sea salt, grew fruit and eventually vegetables. The region became a major source of vegetables for the Venetians once the salt marshes were drained and cultivated. Winter squash became a key staple for the winter months and especially for the poor who could not afford or access meat as readily. The rich, dense Marina di Chioggia, storing for up to six months, filled this winter food gap, and its incredible depth of flavor quickly spread throughout Italy and the world. This beauty of a squash is still served on the canals of Venice, grilled with olive oil by the bargemen and served as a whole wedge. A sweet and savory delight, for sure! Its meaty and sweet texture has also made this pumpkin popular as a filling for ravioli and for making gnocchi.

  • Full Sun
  • Sprouts in 5-10 Days
  • Ideal Temperature: 70-95 Degrees F
  • Seed Depth: 1/2-1 inch
  • Plant Spacing: 18-36"
  • Frost Hardy: No
  • Cucurbita maxima

Growing Tips: Direct seed, or set out transplants after last frost date. Don’t let transplants become rootbound; don't disturb roots while transplanting. Needs rich soil. Harvest when rinds become very hard.

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